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The View covers breaking news and media on the Cartagena Summit on a Mine-Free World.

From November 30th to December 4th, 2009, hundreds of international organizations will meet in Cartagena, Colombia to assess the impact of the 1997 Ottawa Treaty, a watershed agreement between states and nations to ban all anti-personnel mines.

The blog is an initiative of Survivor Corps, a leading advocate for the rights of conflict survivors. Created by landmine survivors, Survivor Corps believes those who have survived war are most invested in building peace.

Meet the Survivor Corps Team


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    Cartagena Summit

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    International Campaign to Ban Landmines

    Cluster Munition Coalition

    Mine Ban Treaty

    Obama’s Opportunity to Lead a Landmine-Free World

    By Queen Noor of Jordan

    The following article ran in The Huffington Post on Thursday, December 3rd.

    For twelve years, the United States has refused to ban a weapon that kills and mutilates innocent women, men and children even in peacetime. The time has come for the world’s most powerful high-tech military to give up its low-tech stockpile of ten million antipersonnel landmines.

    Today there are millions of mines buried in over 80 countries, and over 160 million more stored in arsenals waiting to go in the ground. These indiscriminate devices lay dormant until detonated by something living — a child walking to school, a farmer or grazing livestock. One victim at a time, these ‘weapons of mass destruction in slow motion’ have killed in total more people than nuclear, chemical and biological weapons combined. If they don’t cause immediate death, they maim and blind their victims.

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    December 04, 2009, 12:38pm   Comments

    2009 Landmine Monitor Report released!

    The International Campaign to Ban Landmines released their annual report yesterday, November 12.  The report, compiled by a worldwide network of researchers, tracks each country’s progress in eradicating landmine threat, and includes updated numbers such as annual casualties, landmines removed, and risk education recipients.

    Overall, the results are encouraging. In the past decade, over 2.2 million anti-personnel mines, 250,000 anti-vehicle mines and 17 million other explosives left over from wars have been removed.  But there is still a long way to go, especially in aiding landmine survivors:

    Despite this high level of overall funding, over the past decade victim assistance has made the least progress of all the major sectors of mine action, with funding and action falling far short of what was needed. Most efforts remained focused on medical care and physical rehabilitation, often only when supported by international organizations and funding, rather than on promoting economic self-reliance for survivors, their families, and communities.

    Check out the full report here.  And learn how you can help landmine surivors by visiting the Survivor Corps website.



    November 13, 2009, 3:59pm   Comments

    Review: Tirana Workshop on Achieving a Mine-Free South Eastern Europe, 7-9 October 2009

    From 7-9 October, members of the International Campaign to Ban Landmines (ICBL) gathered in Tirana, Albania for the Tirana Workshop on Achieving a Mine-Free South Eastern Europe to conduct advocacy and outreach in support of the Mine Ban Treaty, as well as the Convention on Cluster Munitions. This was the last of a series of regional meetings convened in the lead-up to the Cartagena Summit (Second Review Conference of the Mine Ban Treaty) which will take place in Colombia, from 29 November - 4 December 2009.

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    October 29, 2009, 12:39pm   Comments

    Campaign urges hold-out states to ban landmines

    Photo: Mary Wareham

    (New York: 23 October 2009)- Governments that have still not joined the international treaty banning antipersonnel landmines should participate in a forthcoming global summit and join the agreement without delay, said the International Campaign to Ban Landmines (ICBL) today at an event at the United Nations in New York.

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    October 23, 2009, 12:14pm   Comments

    Meet the Survivor Corps Cartagena Team: Albert Nzamukwereka

    My name is Albert, and it will be a great pleasure to meet all of you in Cartagena in November.

    I am the Country Program Coordinator of Survivor Corps in Rwanda (East Africa) and I have been working with SC since last year.  I am happy to be part of this amazing team. I’ve been involved in monitoring and advocacy of the Committee of the Cluster Munitions Coalition (CMC), the Mine Ban Treaty, and the International Campaign to Ban Landmines (ICBL).

    I hope our meeting achieves its goals of ensuring the implementation of all related treaties.



    October 09, 2009, 1:55pm   Comments

    » Nobel Laureate Urges Governments to Work Harder on a Mine-Free South-Eastern Europe and Caucasus

    Tirana, 7 October 2009 - States of South-Eastern Europe and the Caucasus still have large steps to take on the road to becoming ‘mine-free’, said the Nobel Peace Laureate International Campaign to Ban Landmines (ICBL) today on the opening of a regional meeting on landmines.



    October 07, 2009, 2:01pm  Comments

    About Us

    View from the Summit covers breaking news and media on the Cartagena Summit on a Mine-Free World. From November 30th to December 4th, 2009, hundreds of international organizations will meet in Cartagena, Colombia to assess the impact of the 1997 Ottawa Treaty, a watershed agreement between states and nations to ban all anti-personnel mines. The international community will evaluate the progress made since the treaty’s inception and will “redouble its efforts to end, forever, the suffering and casualties caused by anti-personnel mines.”

    The blog is an initiative of Survivor Corps, a leader in the Nobel Peace Prize-winning International Campaign to Ban Landmines which caused the Mine Ban Treaty’s creation.Created by landmine survivors, Survivor Corps believes those who have survived war are more invested in building peace.



    October 04, 2009, 12:00am   Comments